March 2nd

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On March 2nd, 1904, Theodor Seuss Geisel was born – known more commonly by his pen name, Dr. Seuss.

The American writer and cartoonist studied at Dartmouth University and the University of Oxford. Leaving university in 1927, his work involved providing illustrations to various publications and, during WW2, he worked in an animation department of the US army – one animation he created whilst in this department earned him the Academy Award for Documentary Feature in 1947.

Famous as a children’s author, Dr. Seuss’ published over 60 books. His most famous works include:
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  • If I Ran the Zoo (1950)
  • Horton Hears a Who! (1955)
  • If I Ran the Circus (1956)
  • The Cat in the Hat (1957)
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957)
  • Green Eggs and Ham (1960)

Dr. Seuss was, politically, a liberal Democrat. Due to his early role animating in the US army, he produced several cartoons which were staunchly anti-fascist both before and after 1941.

Seuss also, controversially, supported  Japanese internment during WW2 following President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 in 1942 (Seuss was a keen supporter of both Roosevelt and the New Deal).

Interestingly, in the early days of the Cold War he made political cartoons condemning the ‘Red scare’ culture in the USA, criticising the House Un-American Activities Committees as being the greatest threat to liberty.

Nonsense wakes up the brain cells. And it helps develop a sense of humor, which is awfully important in this day and age.

At the age of 87, Dr. Seuss passed away on September 24th 1991.

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